Liverpool Astronomical Society



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The Young Astronomers Club Wikipage 2014/15

October 16th 2014. Young Astronomers Club, Pex Hill 7-8:30pm

We had a talk by Jodie about the ESA Rosetta Mission to land on a comet.
We had lots of free magazines from Astronomy Now, Sky at Night and Popular Astronomy - thanks to those publications for giving us loads of free magazines at last weekend's NorthWestAstrofest. Some of the magazines had an article about the subject of the talk, the Rosetta mission (Aug 2014 Astronomy Now)
We tried to see the night sky but it was too cloudy. The ISS went over at about 8:10pm. We tried to see it but it was too cloudy to observe.
Dave Galvin showed several groups of youngsters how to use the Meade 12" SCT telescope in the observatory dome using a computer control.
Plenty of activity and chat tonight. A brief clear patch allowed some youngsters to point the telescope at Vega.

Constellation Watch

We want you to learn more about the constellations in the Northern Night sky. So this session we're giving you 2 constellations each month to learn about. This month the constellations to focus on are Lyra and Andromeda. Use the internet or an astronomy planetarium program or an App on your mobile device to find out the following;
  • what the constellations of Lyra and Andromeda look like whereabouts they are in the night sky, be able to find them in the sky and draw their shape with the stars.
  • What are the ancient myths around both constellations.
  • what the 2 brightest stars are in each constellation.
  • name up to 4 deep sky or Messier objects within the constellation boundaries.

Help & Tips for Constellation Watch
A very bright star can be found in Lyra. A really good galaxy can be found in Andromeda. Plenty of other bright stars and deep sky or Messier objects to be found too. We will want you to show us these constellations in the November night sky. Andromeda can be found by looking for the W of Cassiopeia. Andromeda is underneath Cassiopeia in the Eastern skies when it goes dark. It is a long string of stars that ends at Perseus. It is also adjacent the square of Pegasus. Lyra is quite easy to find, it is almost directly above you and looks like a parallelogram with one of the brightest stars in the sky close to the parallelogram. Several deep sky or Messier objects to find in both constellations. Find out about the double star in Andromeda. Find out about an object known as the Double-Double, what is it and where is it.

A really good website that I use regularly is the Hawaii Astronomical Society constellations pages. Try these;
http://www.hawastsoc.org/deepsky/and/index.html
http://www.hawastsoc.org/deepsky/lyr/index.html

More helpful information





November 20th 2014. Pex Hill, 7 - 8:30pm, next Young Astronomers Club

Talk will be about Galaxies and we'll be observing constellations and deep sky objects if it's clear.
We'll also be reviewing the Constellations Watch work you have completed.
Thanks to everyone that came along to the November Young Astronomers Club. Hope you enjoyed the talk about galaxies from Dave Owen. And I hope you managed to look through one of the telescopes at a couple of galaxies. The weather was ok a bit hazy so the deep sky galaxies were not at their best but we managed to see something this evening.

Constellation Watch
For those wanting to take part in the constellation watch (and I'd like to encourage you to do so) the constellations to research this month are Orion and Cassiopeia. If you missed last month's take a look at October's constellation watch too (see above).
  • what the constellations of Orion and Cassiopeia look like, whereabouts they are in the night sky, be able to find them in the sky and draw their shape with the stars.
  • What are the ancient myths around both constellations.
  • what the 2 brightest stars are in each constellation.
  • Identify some double stars within the constellation.
  • name up to 4 deep sky or Messier objects within the constellation boundaries.
You can start by looking at the 2 websites below
http://www.hawastsoc.org/deepsky/ori/index.html
http://www.hawastsoc.org/deepsky/cas/index.html

More to come soon but please try to learn the constellations for our October and November Constellation Watch
More tips:



Visit of Astronomia

Friday 21st November, LAS Monthly meeting, Quaker Meeting house, School Lane, Liverpool City centre from 7pm
Several of you have been asking me about buying a telescope - read on
An event you might wish to attend if you're thinking of a telescope for Christmas and that is on Friday 21st November the LAS Monthly Meeting talk is from Adele Horton of Astronomia. The talk is about buying your first telescope. The monthly meetings take place at the Quaker Meeting House, School lane, Liverpool City Centre, L1 3BT. Contact Gerard Gilligan for more information contact the society secretary ggastro@liverpool.ac.uk


Saturday 22nd November at Pex Hill Observatory
If you want a telescope for Christmas and don't want to go to the monthly meeting above then don't miss the visit of Astronomia to Pex Hill Observatory on 22nd November. There will be plenty of telescopes to view and purchase plus accessories.
http://www.astronomia.co.uk For more information contact Brendan Martin the observatory director brendan-martin@live.co.uk



December 18th 2014, 7pm to 8:30pm Young Astronomers Club at Pex Hill

The December club is just before Christmas and will include a talk about our Solar System from David Forshaw. There'll be observing, astro photography and anything else we can do on the night. Anything you're particularly interested in? Let us know.

Don't forget our Constellation Watch.
Octobers' constellation watch was Andromeda and Lyra. Scroll up to October for info on those and what you need to do.
Novembers' constellation watch was Orion and Cassiopeia. So do the research and find out about these 2 constellations for the December club. Find out where they are in the sky, what the constellations look like, about the historical myth behind their names, the names of the brightest stars, what double stars are within the constellations and name up to 4 deep sky or Messier objects within the constellation. This is just of fun, it's really good to learn stuff about the constellations, it helps you make sense of the night sky and find your way around it.
Scroll up to November for info and what to research.


Some more information about December's constellation watch, Cygnus and Taurus. Just for fun but a great way to learn more about the constellation in the night sky. Find out about this month's constellations and if you haven't looked at the previous month's take a look at those too. Scroll pup the page to find out more.


Brendan, Dave, Jodie, Geoff, Steve


January 15th 2015, 7pm to 8:30pm. Young Astronomers' Club at Pex Hill

Thanks to all those that braved the bad weather and managed to make it to the January Young Astronomers Club at Pex Hill.
Hope you enjoyed the talk on Mars and thanks to Gerard for giving a great talk.


It was quite windy but we managed to open the dome roof and use the 12” Meade plus we put a couple of telescopes outside. The rain stayed off and the sky actually cleared long enough for everyone to observe Comet C/2014 Q2 Lovejoy through binoculars or one of the telescopes. Others also managed to glimpse the Orion Nebula and we observed Jupiter with it’s Moons later on.


Keep checking the news for the comet as it is anticipated that during January it will brighten up. Here’s a link to a chart to help find it courtesy Astronomy Now magazine
http://astronomynow.com/2015/01/06/see-comet-lovejoy-at-its-best/

Constellation Watch
This month the constellations to focus on are Monoceros and Ursa Major. 2 very different constellations. Monoceros is difficult to find whereas Ursa Major is an easy constellation to find. Find out what the pointer stars are used for in Ursa Major.
Use the internet or an astronomy planetarium program or an App on your mobile device to find out the following;

  • identify the 2 constellations, be able to find them in the night sky and draw their shape or pattern made with the stars in the constellation.
  • are there any ancient myths around both constellations.
  • what are the 2 brightest stars in each constellation.
  • name some deep sky or Messier objects within the constellation boundaries.
  • Ursa Major is circumpolar, what does that mean?

Here's some more info to help you.........





February 12th 2015, 7pm to 8:30pm. Young Astronomers' Club at Pex Hill

Welcome to those that came for the first time last Thursday. I hope you all enjoyed the evening and apologies that the cloud didn’t clear away all evening. We had a great talk from Brendan about the Life and Death of a star. Unfortuntely it was too cloudy to observe anything tonight.

Our March Society eNewsletter is now available and it includes an article about the forthcoming Partial Solar Eclipse as viewed from Liverpool area.
Click below to download it
http://steveswikisite.wikispaces.com/LiverpoolAS_eNewsletter_download_site_for_free

Venus is still s wonderful dusk object at the moment in the South West close to Mars.
Jupiter is still a great object in the South East in the late evening
Comet Lovejoy is still up there, in between the constellations of Perseus and Andromeda at the moment.
Click below for a Star Chart showing Comet Lovejoy C/2014 Q2
http://astronomynow.com/2015/02/05/track-comet-lovejoy-through-february/






March 12th 2015, 7pm to 8:30pm. Young Astronomer' Club at Pex Hill

This is the last Young Astronomers evening of this session. We'll be talking about how to safely observe the forth coming Solar Eclipse (20th March 2015 from 8:30am). There will be talks from some of our Young Astronomers on the Solar System, the Moon's phases, Jupiter, Gravity and Pluto. Plenty more to do, let's hope it's a clear evening. See you there
Steve, Geoff, Brendan & Jodie

Observing the forthcoming Partial Solar Eclipse March 20th from 08:26am
If you're planning on observing the Solar Eclipse from the Merseyside area then you can expect to see the Moon covering 90% of the Sun.
1st Contact 08:26am
Maximum 09:30 - 09:31am
Event ends 10:40am
Take a look at our advise about observing the eclipse and I've also attached the BAA & SPA article with further information
MOST IMPORTANTLY - OBSERVE SAFELY. DO NOT LOOK DIRECTLY AT THE SUN AND DO NOT USE A TELESCOPE, BINOCULARS OR ANY OPTICAL DEVICE TO LOOK AT THE SUN

OUR INFORMATION AND THE BAA/SPA ECLIPSE LEAFLET

http://liverpoolas.org/young-astronomers-club/